Tag Archives: Facebook

Taking a look at Facebook Insights

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This semester I was asked to take a look into the University of Florida’s Facebook page and make recommendations as to what I think would be the best practices going forward for their brand.

To take a look at my full less than 15 minute presentation, click here: UF MMC Final ASC 2.0

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Images on the Internet

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Boston

When it comes to the internet and images, it truly can be a dangerous place. There are so many people taking images of everything around them, or sharing content that they deem interesting or something that should be shared that there is no way for people to be safe from all images. When someone posts something on their page, it shows up on others and whether or not you are ready for them, they can be seared into your mind.

Such is the case with photos from the Boston Bombing. While it is important for people to see the tragedy, and understand the horror that people went through that day, there is also the case of people being bombarded with horrifyingly graphic images. Ethically, how does that work? What if you knew a loved one was running the marathon and while you were looking on their Facebook to see if they had posted something, an image of them in pain showed up on your feed unknowingly posted by someone else? Can you imagine the gut wrenching heartbreak? While someone did this unintentionally, while trying to get the information out to the public, it still should be thought about in more ways than one.

What about children who are on social media? On one hand, the argument is that children shouldn’t be on social media, but what is the age requirement, 13 years old? If they are friends with their aunts, uncles and cousins, odds are someone can share something that is graphic and unsettling and someone who should have warning is shocked by the images. While these occurrences are important and should not be diminished or ignored because of wanting to not scare people, at the same time, sometimes I think a graphic image warning would be great.

NSFW

I know that images that are “Not Safe For Work” or NSFW have warnings, why not images that are graphic enough to emote a reaction of shock and horror? This way people would be aware of what is going on while not having the shock of seeing an image they were not prepared for.

Ethically, I think that people do not always take into consideration that what they are posting will be seen by others. I know I have not always considered the implications of what I am posting, it is natural to only think of what you want to post, and not of what other people will be seeing. However, I think that if people put a little more thought into what they post and if major companies took the time to create a warning on articles that are being shared across the web, it would make social media a safer place.

Work and Social Media, Do you know the rules?

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I currently have a full time position where I work with social media all day long. While I only manage one brand, there is a lot of research that goes into finding good content to post, plan for the next week, and so on. That being said, I check Facebook about 10 times a day. While I don’t check it right when I wake up unless it is the weekend, I work with Facebook and am on it constantly. While I manage a separate page, all of the groups I monitor are linked to my personal page and in checking all of them periodically, I also check in on what my friends are doing for a couple of minutes here and there.

My company logs every site that we go on and I think it is completely ethical to do so. I know that I am being tracked because I am constantly coming across sites that are blocked while I am doing research and I know that is monitored. Ethically, I think that as long as it is acknowledged that they will be tracked it is fine. I think that while it should be common sense that everything can be tracked, I think it should be written down in an employee contract so that people really do understand the implications of what they are doing. Unfortunately, people still do not understand what they are doing when they are on social media at work.

I personally have my place of work show on my Facebook and LinkedIn page, however I am also very focused on not posting anything inappropriate on social media. I feel that I am my own brand and I am my own advocate and if I do not think it is in my best interest, I don’t post it. I don’t think posting something about having a busy day or a stressful day is a bad thing, however posting about being drunk or any kind of lewd behavior would make me think that it might just be easier to not attach anything to my profiles.

While I think that there are some policies that are more strict, I do think that there should be some kind concept of not allowing social media to overwhelm their work mainly because social media is a major distraction. While some people can handle it properly and only check things occasionally as a break, some people truly are addicted to checking and monitoring social media and it can create a really stagnant work environment where not a lot of things are getting done.

Behavior and Values

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Social-Media-Sites

I think when it comes to various networks there are subtle differences in the way that people act on all of them. For instance, I act differently on all of my platforms. On LinkedIn I stay completely professional and only join groups based on social media, on Instagram I keep things focused on my daily life, my dogs, what I eat and fitness. On Facebook I focus on my friendships and sharing various funny stories that I come across, on Twitter I focus on social media and occasionally interesting thoughts. On Pinterest I focus on crafts and things I want to do in my house as well as recipes and wedding planning, and on my blog I focus on social media and how various companies handle social media.

I feel that I am not the only one who handles different platforms in different ways. I feel as though it is common practice to act differently since people follow you for different reasons and it is boring to follow people on all of the same platforms and see all of the same things everywhere. If I see someone auto-posting the same information of various sites I would honestly want to unfollow them because it would be boring.

When people connect on Facebook I think it is to see what people do in their lives, on Twitter I think it is for quick information and for inspiration, Instagram is to visually share everything that is happening in a day in the life, LinkedIn to connect professionally, Pinterest to share great ideas and more. I think it is easy to see why people would share differently on different sites since there is an accepted difference in how to act. When people post pictures of their day to Facebook all the time, people get annoyed because that is what Instagram is for. Just like when people consistently post everything that they are doing to Facebook, since that is what Twitter is used for.

While I do not think that it is a big deal when people commit social media faux pas, I do think it cause people to not want to stay in communication with them on that particular platform, if at all.

There are different ways to handle connecting with people on these platforms, and a good rule of them is to never engage in a fight on any of the platforms. In fact, a lot of people that I know have a policy of “if you have nothing nice to say, say nothing” especially on posts regarding fitness. I personally don’t delete anything whether it is positive or negative, but I do reward people who post by commenting. I think it reinforces the fact that I love engaging with people who read my work, so comment below!

Watch Your Reputation

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Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 8.51.03 PMWhen it comes to reputation management, British Airways learned the hard way that social media is playing a bigger part than it used to. I have previously mentioned that Dave Carroll reached out and created a video after being upset with how his broken guitars were handled. Here is the story from Dave’s point of view. While British Airways did offer him flight vouchers and the cost of his guitar as chronicled in this article, a bigger part of that is how this got out of control before that happened.
When looking back at this, it is always easier to point out what works since hindsight is 20/20. To give you an idea of what I am talking about, this video went viral before it really got attention from the company.

So what does this mean for someone who is in charge of an online reputation? I think it should be treated just as an argument that would have occurred face to face. The first step would have been to handle this in a timely manner, since that didn’t occur right off the bat; I would start with an apology. A sincere apology can make people feel better about the situation that they are in. After that, an expectation should be set for resolution, such as, we will get back to you about this within a day, or however long the company sets as a time. As far as giving them a free ticket or paying them back for their guitars, while it may have been what would have made them happy originally, at this point and with this much media coverage it seems as though it would be British Airways trying to buy their silence. Instead of just offering money, something that usually makes people more at ease with the situation is changing policy. When any company has a situation and realizes that what they were doing doesn’t work anymore, they should change their policy and move forward instead of apologizing for the past or trying to justify their current policy.

I have never encountered this severe of a customer service problem, but a common frustration I have noticed by either myself or people around me is that companies choose to justify policies that don’t make sense. There is no need to stick to a policy that doesn’t work and customers would like to see a company work through an issue and come out with a better procedure than they had when they first began dealing with them. In this case, a change of policy when it comes to how soon people are expected to respond within would make a big difference.

Flying Into Trouble

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Screen Shot 2014-06-08 at 6.51.40 PMI remember hearing about the man who took out an ad against British Airways. What should British Airways do? I honestly don’t know. I don’t think they can complain to Twitter since it was a valid tweet and a valid complaint. While they did apologize, I don’t know what they can do. At some point it came out that this man paid $1000.00 to promote this tweet. While I do think they should do something, such as offer him a new flight first class, I don’t know if that really is the right thing to do. I also don’t think they should only have someone manning the social media from 9am-5pm when they have flights at all different times. I also think that this man was so angry at this point that even if they had offered a flight, I don’t know if it would even fix anything, but it would have saved face with other customers.

Whether or not they lost this customer, by offering compensation it would have shown other customers how they at least tried to handle the situation. I think it is important when dealing with a customer service issue to even address what you don’t know. I don’t always know who I should be reaching out to for information since I am new, but I respond and ask for email so that I can reach out to the proper person on their behalf. I think setting the expectation of someone getting back to them this week is also helpful since they know they will not be getting an email back in 4 hours.

This song is hilarious, but the fact that Dave felt the need to write this, should really astonish the company. I think in both cases that ethically leaving their customers feeling as though they don’t care, is wrong. While they may not have realized just how important customer relations are, especially now that social media has become a forum for people to voice their good and bad experiences.

Old Navy and Customers

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This week I decided to take a look at how Old Navy was connecting with their customers. I look at both their Facebook and Twitter account to see how they responded to any and all customer interactions.

Facebook:

Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 11.17.40 AMLooking at their Facebook page and seeing all of the customer interactions that were answered and the ones that were ignored, it is interesting to see how they choose to portray their customer voice. I have seen that Old Navy does make an effort to post in an upbeat and friendly manner and that they offer help and assistance when they can and explain when it was a mistake on the customer end nicely. However, they don’t respond to every comment. There are a lot of comments that go unanswered. I am wondering if part of that is because they have multiple people answering comments on the same post. I think for their purposes, it would make more sense to assign a person to each post to ensure that every comment was answered. I am sure for the people who are commenting and seeing their questions or concerned ignored, it is very upsetting. I think that they are doing a great job of speaking in a consistent tone, but the majority of their posts are selling to customers. I think it would be great if they added more informational posts about outfits since those get a lot of comments and may end up selling pieces that people want without directly offering a sale or discount.

Twitter:

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When it comes to Twitter, I think Old Navy does a much better job of not only reaching out to people who are commenting on their posts, but also sharing posts that they are tagged in. This shows how they are interacting and connecting to people and making sure that they make their customers feel heard. I think it is very important to consistently make people feel as though they are being heard, and by Old Navy retweeting or making something a favorite, it is a simple way to accomplish that. I still think that they need to not consistently sell to the people connecting with them online. It is something that can be a huge turn off to people who are not huge fans of the company.

 

While this company has been able to consistently keep a warm and friendly voice when posting and when interacting with people, they have not hit the right amount of how often they should be selling a product and how often they should be posting other interesting tidbits. I think that if they were able to  branch out their posts they would be doing a lot better when it comes to connecting with customers and gaining new followers.